U.S. $1 Morgan Dollar
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  • 950 Silverado Street La Jolla, CA 92037    •    1 (858) 412-6462
    Section 1
    We will beat any advertised price in SD County!!!

    U.S. $1 Morgan Dollar (VF/XF)

    Buy the Morgan Dollar today from United Coin & Precious Metals.
    We Buy

    $ 0.00

    We Sell

    $ 29.00

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    Toll Free : 1-855-253-0642

    About This Product

    Looking to buy US $1 Morgan Dollar (VF/XF) coins in San Diego?

    The U.S. $1 Morgan dollar is a beautiful coin for those with an appreciation for bullion and history. For an oftentimes low premium, investors can enjoy holding a piece of history in their silver collection.

    Carson City Morgan Dollars are among the rarest versions of one of the most beautiful coins in US history. CC Morgan Dollars were struck between 1878 and 1893, making them an attainable short set for collectors. Premiums on Carson City Morgan Dollars remain strong. Recently, an 1882 CC Morgan dollar in its original black plastic GSA case and graded MS-62 by NGC sold for $170, while a VF of this common CC without a GSA holder sold for $120 dollars.

    U.S. $1 Silver Morgan Dollar

    The MS-65 Morgan Dollar

    Rarer GSA Morgan Dollars, like the 1879-CC and the 1889-CC dollars, still are not found in large quantities. An entry-level Mint State 1879-CC Morgan Dollar costs upwards of $6,000, whilst solid VF examples are approaching $300.

    From 1887 to 1904, Morgan Silver dollars were issued by mints in Philadelphia, San Francisco, New Orleans and Carson City. Morgan dies were destroyed when production ended. Nonetheless, they were struck once more for a short time during 1921 at Philadelphia, San Francisco and Denver mints for a short time before being replaced by post-World War 1 Peace Dollars.

    In the 1960s, a reserve of Morgan Dollars was discovered in US Treasury vaults.  The coins were sold in the 1970s, culminating in the final sale of more than 200,000 uncirculated Morgans in 1980.

    The worth of a Morgan Silver dollar is based on its date, mint mark and condition. Examples struck during the late 1870s and early 188s are considered desirable.

    If you are interested in Morgan Dollars, or looking to sell, be sure to give United Coin & Precious Metals a call, or visit our La Jolla location, to learn more about this unique opportunity.

    Looking to buy the Morgan Dollar in San Diego, California?

    Located in Sunny San Diego, California – a city with a proud military tradition – United Coin & Precious Metals offers San Diego residents to buy gold and buy silver in a comfortable environment in the La Jolla cove.

    United Coin & Precious Metals has made a name for itself in the community for its expertise in semi-nusmismatics, in particular pre-1933-gold coins and Silver Morgan Dollars.

    Morgan dollars are a beautiful coin for those with an appreciation for bullion and history. For an oftentimes low premium, investors can enjoy holding a piece of history in their silver collection.

    Carson City Morgan Dollars are among the rarest versions of one of the most beautiful coins in US history. CC Morgan Dollars were struck between 1878 and 1893, making them an attainable short set for collectors. Premiums on Carson City Morgan Dollars remain strong. Recently, an 1882 CC Morgan dollar in its original black plastic GSA case and graded MS-62 by NGC sold for $170, while a VF of this common CC without a GSA holder sold for $120 dollars.

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    Rarer GSA Morgan Dollars, like the 1879-CC and the 1889-CC dollars, still are not found in large quantities. An entry-level Mint State 1879-CC Morgan Dollar costs upwards of $6,000, whilst solid VF examples are approaching $300.

    From 1887 to 1904, Morgan Silver dollars were issued by mints in Philadelphia, San Francisco, New Orleans and Carson City. Morgan dies were destroyed when production ended. Nonetheless, they were struck once more for a short time during 1921 at Philadelphia, San Francisco and Denver mints for a short time before being replaced by post-World War 1 Peace Dollars.

    In the 1960s, a reserve of Morgan Dollars was discovered in US Treasury vaults.  The coins were sold in the 1970s, culminating in the final sale of more than 200,000 uncirculated Morgans in 1980.

    The worth of a Morgan Silver dollar is based on its date, mint mark and condition. Examples struck during the late 1870s and early 188s are considered desirable.

    morgan_dollars_raw

    If you are interested in Morgan Dollars, or looking to sell, be sure to give United Coin & Precious Metals a call, or visit our La Jolla location, to learn more about this unique opportunity.

    The Morgan Silver Dollar is a United States dollar coin minted intermittently from 1878 to 1921. The coin is named for its designer, United States Mint Assistant Engraver George T. Morgan. The obverse portrays a profile portrait representing Liberty, whilst the reverse depicts an eagle with its wings outstretched.

    The dollar was authorized by the Bland-Allison Act. Following the passage of the Fourth Coinage Act, mining interests lobbied to restore the free coinage. Instead, the Bland–Allison Act was passed, which required the Treasury to purchase between two and four million dollars worth of silver at market value to be coined into dollars each month. In 1890, the Bland–Allison Act was repealed by the Sherman Silver Purchase Act, which required the Treasury to purchase 4,500,000 troy ounces (140,000 kg) of silver each month, but only required further silver dollar production for one year. This act, in turn, was repealed in 1893.

    In 1898, Congress approved a bill that required all remaining bullion purchased under the Sherman Silver Purchase Act to be coined into silver dollars. By 1904, those silver reserves had been depleted. And so the Mint ceased to strike the Morgan dollar.

    And then, The Pittman Act of 1918 authorized melting and recoining of millions of silver dollars. The Morgan dollars thus resumed mintage for one year in 1921. Later the same year, the design was replaced by the Peace Dollar.

    In the early 1960′s, many uncirculated Morgan dollars were made available from Treasury vaults, including issues that were hitherto considered rare. Beginning in the 1970s, the Treasury conducted a sale of silver dollars minted at the Carson City Mint through General Service Administration.

    U.S. $1 Silver Morgan Dollar